Serevent / Salmeterol Xinafoate

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Modified on 2009/10/14 21:44 by admin
In 1994 the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approved salmeterol xinafoate, sold as Serevent by GlaxoSmithKline, for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Serevent is generally prescribed for use with inhaled steroids and is one of the most popular prescription asthma drugs in use.

Serevent is sold as an inhalation aerosol or inhalation powder and can control asthma symptoms for up to 12 hours by relaxing constricted muscles surrounding bronchial passages. Serevent is not effective for the treatment of acute asthma attacks.

Two recent studies indicate that using Serevent alone only controls the symptoms of asthma but does not alleviate the underlying lung inflammation.

In August 2003, the FDA announced the addition of new safety information and warnings to the labeling for drug products that contain salmeterol. The new labeling includes a boxed warning about a small, but significant, increased risk of life-threatening asthma episodes or asthma-related deaths observed in patients taking salmeterol in a recently completed large U.S. safety study.

In November 2005, FDA requested manufacturers of Advair Diskus, Foradil Aerolizer, and Serevent Diskus to update their existing product labels with new warnings and a Medication Guide for patients to alert health care professionals and patients that these medicines may increase the chance of severe asthma episodes, and death when those episodes occur. All of these products contain medicines belonging to the class known as "long-acting beta 2-adrenergic agonists" (LABA), which are long-acting bronchodilator medicines. Bronchodilator medicines, such as LABAs, help to relax the muscles around the airways in the lungs. Wheezing (bronchospasm) happens when the muscles around the airways tighten. Even though LABAs decrease the frequency of asthma episodes, these medicines may make asthma episodes more severe when they occur.



See Also

  1. Asthma Drugs: Overview
  2. Asthma: Overview
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