Cytotec / Misoprostol

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Modified on 2009/10/14 21:36 by admin
Cytotec, also known by its generic name misoprostol, is an anti-ulcer drug manufactured by Searle Pharmaceuticals. Primarily used to prevent stomach ulcers, many obstetricians prescribe cytotec to pregnant women in order to induce labor. While the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved cytotec for the prevention of ulcers, the FDA has not approved cytotec as an agent to induce labor.

Despite the lack of FDA approval as a delivery drug, doctors have used cytotec to induce labor for several years. The use of a drug in a manner for which it has not received FDA approval is known as "off label" use and is permitted by the FDA. However, since Searle solely promotes cytotec as an ulcer prevention medication, and never intended the drug to be used as an inducement agent, no clinical trials were conducted to determine cytotec's safety when given to pregnant women. Instead, for several years obstetricians have used expectant women as guinea pigs, experimenting during labor in order to determine the ideal cytotec dose necessary to induce.

Admittedly, cytotec does appear very effective in inducing labor. However, many women have suffered severe and life threatening adverse reactions to cytotec. Over the last decade, during labor inducing experiments conducted on unsuspecting pregnant women, many were given excessive doses of cytotec. Such large doses may cause the uterus to rupture, especially in mothers who had previously undergone cesarean section. A ruptured uterus can be life threatening to both mother and child. If your doctor failed to secure your informed consent prior to administering cytotec, and you or your child suffered serious injuries after receiving this drug, it may be important to contact an attorney who can help you protect your legal rights. Please keep in mind that there may be time limits within which you must commence suit.



See Also

  1. Pregnancy & Female Reproduction Drugs: Overview
  2. Birth Injuries
  3. Excessive Bleeding: Overview
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