Cialis / Tadalafil

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Modified on 2009/10/14 21:51 by admin
Icos Corp. and Eli Lilly and Co. received Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approval of their erectile dysfunction (ED) drug Cialis in November 2003. Cialis appears to be effective in the treatment of men with diabetes-related ED. Sixty-four percent of diabetics who took Cialis during clinical trials showed erectile performance improvements. Patients suffering from diabetes often complain of problems associated with impotence as diabetes impedes blood flow to the penis.

Side effects of the drug include, but may not be limited to, headache and dyspepsia.

In July 2005, FDA notified healthcare professionals of updated labeling for Cialis, Levitra and Viagra to reflect a small number of post-marketing reports of sudden vision loss, attributed to NAION (non arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy), a condition where blood flow is blocked to the optic nerve. FDA advises patients to stop taking these medicines, and call a doctor or healthcare provider right away if they experience sudden or decreased vision loss in one or both eyes. Patients taking or considering taking these products should inform their health care professionals if they have ever had severe loss of vision, which might reflect a prior episode of NAION. Such patients are at an increased risk of developing NAION again. At this time, it is not possible to determine whether these oral medicines for erectile dysfunction were the cause of the loss of eyesight or whether the problem is related to other factors such as high blood pressure or diabetes, or to a combination of these problems.

See your doctor if you have experienced serious side effects associated with Cialis. In addition, it may be important to contact an attorney who can help you protect your legal rights. Please keep in mind that there may be time limits within which you must commence suit.



See Also

  1. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs: Overview
  2. Blindness
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