Antimony

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Modified on 2009/10/14 21:36 by admin
Antimony is a silvery-white metal that is found in the earth's crust. Antimony ores are mined and then mixed with other metals to form antimony alloys or combined with oxygen to form antimony oxide.

Little antimony is currently mined in the United States. It is brought into this country from other countries for processing. However, there are companies in the United States that produce antimony as a by-product of smelting lead and other metals.

Antimony isn't used alone because it breaks easily, but when mixed into alloys, it is used in lead storage batteries, solder, sheet and pipe metal, bearings, castings, and pewter. Antimony oxide is added to textiles and plastics to prevent them from catching fire. It is also used in paints, ceramics, and fireworks, and as enamels for plastics, metal, and glass.

Exposure to antimony occurs in the workplace or from skin contact with soil at hazardous waste sites. Breathing high levels of antimony for a long time can irritate the eyes and lungs, and can cause problems with the lungs, heart, and stomach. This chemical has been found in at least 403 of 1,416 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency.

See a doctor if you or a family member has been harmed by Antimony. In addition, it may be important to contact an attorney who can help you protect your legal rights. Please keep in mind that there may be timelimits within which you must commence suit.

Attorneys associatedwith InjuryBoard.com will evaluate your case free of charge. In addition, you will not pay any legal fees unless your attorney recovers money for you. Please click on the free contact an attorney button to take advantage of this valuable service.

See Also

  1. Toxic & Hazardous Substances
  2. Diarrhea: Overview
  3. Digestive Disorders: Overview
  4. Hair Loss: Overview
  5. Heart Problems
  6. Kidney & Urinary Tract Disorders
  7. Liver Problems
  8. Lung & Airway Disorders
  9. Lung Cancer: Overview
  10. Antimony: Frequently Asked Questions
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